John Stuart Mill citáty

John Stuart Mill foto
8  12

John Stuart Mill

Dátum narodenia: 20. máj 1806
Dátum úmrtia: 8. máj 1873
Ďalšie mená:J.S Mill,John S. Mill

Reklama

John Stuart Mill bol britský filozof, logik a ekonóm, morálny a politický teoretik. Prehodnotil a doplnil významným, hlbokým a dobre premysleným spôsobom systém názorov, ktoré sa považujú za výraz úsilia o obranu empirizmu a liberálnych politických náhľadov na spoločnosť a kultúru, čo z neho učinilo najvýznamnejšieho anglického filozofa 19. storočia. Hlavným cieľom jeho filozofie je rozvíjať pozitivistický pohľad na svet a miesto človeka v ňom, čo má výrazne prispieť k pokroku ľudského poznania a slobody jednotlivca v širokospektrálnom význame. Hoci jeho systém nie je úplne originálny, oživenie novými formuláciami pozitivistických a liberálnych názorov na mnohé aspekty spoločenského života uplatnilo a uplatňuje naďalej svoj zásadný vplyv medzi širokou verejnosťou.

Podobní autori

Adam Smith foto
Adam Smith13
škótsky morálny filozof a politický ekonóm
Karl Marx foto
Karl Marx44
nemecký filozof, ekonóm
John Maynard Keynes foto
John Maynard Keynes5
britský ekonóm
Heinrich Mller foto
Heinrich Mller2
nemecký publicista, literárny kritik, politický ekonóm a ...
David Hume foto
David Hume8
škótsky filozof, ekonóm a historik
Anselm Osb Grün foto
Anselm Osb Grün23
nemecký benediktínsky páter a autor
Miloš Zeman foto
Miloš Zeman11
český prezident, bývalý predseda vlády a ekonóm
John Lennon foto
John Lennon13
britský hudobník
Friedrich Engels foto
Friedrich Engels8
nemecký sociológ, autor, politický teoretik a filozof
Herbert Spencer foto
Herbert Spencer9
anglický filozof, biológ, sociológ a prominentný klasický...

Citáty John Stuart Mill

Reklama
Reklama

„The principle itself of dogmatic religion, dogmatic morality, dogmatic philosophy, is what requires to be rooted out; not any particular manifestation of that principle. The very corner-stone of an education intended to form great minds, must be the recognition of the principle, that the object is to call forth the greatest possible quantity of intellectual power, and to inspire the intensest love of truth“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: The principle itself of dogmatic religion, dogmatic morality, dogmatic philosophy, is what requires to be rooted out; not any particular manifestation of that principle. ¶ The very corner-stone of an education intended to form great minds, must be the recognition of the principle, that the object is to call forth the greatest possible quantity of intellectual power, and to inspire the intensest love of truth: and this without a particle of regard to the results to which the exercise of that power may lead, even though it should conduct the pupil to opinions diametrically opposite to those of his teachers. We say this, not because we think opinions unimportant, but because of the immense importance which we attach to them; for in proportion to the degree of intellectual power and love of truth which we succeed in creating, is the certainty that (whatever may happen in any one particular instance) in the aggregate of instances true opinions will be the result; and intellectual power and practical love of truth are alike impossible where the reasoner is shown his conclusions, and informed beforehand that he is expected to arrive at them. ""Civilization,"" London and Westminster Review (April 1836)

„That a thing is unnatural, in any precise meaning which can be attached to the word, is no argument for its being blamable; since the most criminal actions are to a being like man not more unnatural than most of the virtues.“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: Conformity to nature has no connection whatever with right and wrong. The idea can never be fitly introduced into ethical discussions at all, except, occasionally and partially, into the question of degrees of culpability. To illustrate this point, let us consider the phrase by which the greatest intensity of condemnatory feeling is conveyed in connection with the idea of nature - the word "unnatural." That a thing is unnatural, in any precise meaning which can be attached to the word, is no argument for its being blamable; since the most criminal actions are to a being like man not more unnatural than most of the virtues. p. 102

„We are not so absurd as to propose that the teacher should not set forth his own opinions as the true ones and exert his utmost powers to exhibit their truth in the strongest light.“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: We are not so absurd as to propose that the teacher should not set forth his own opinions as the true ones and exert his utmost powers to exhibit their truth in the strongest light. To abstain from this would be to nourish the worst intellectual habit of all, that of not finding, and not looking for, certainty in any teacher. But the teacher himself should not be held to any creed; nor should the question be whether his own opinions are the true ones, but whether he is well instructed in those of other people, and, in enforcing his own, states the arguments for all conflicting opinions fairly. "Civilization," London and Westminster Review (April 1836)

„Stupidity is much the same all the world over.“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: Stupidity is much the same all the world over. A stupid person's notions and feelings may confidently be inferred from those which prevail in the circle by which the person is surrounded. Not so with those whose opinions and feelings are an emanation from their own nature and faculties. Ch. 1

Reklama

„What made Wordsworth's poems a medicine for my state of mind, was that they expressed, not mere outward beauty, but states of feeling, and of thought coloured by feeling, under the excitement of beauty. They seemed to be the very culture of the feelings, which I was in quest of. In them I seemed to draw from a Source of inward joy, of sympathetic and imaginative pleasure, which could be shared in by all human beings; which had no connexion with struggle or imperfection, but would be made richer by every improvement in the physical or social condition of mankind.“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: Scott does this still better than Wordsworth, and a very second-rate landscape does it more effectually than any poet. What made Wordsworth's poems a medicine for my state of mind, was that they expressed, not mere outward beauty, but states of feeling, and of thought coloured by feeling, under the excitement of beauty. They seemed to be the very culture of the feelings, which I was in quest of. In them I seemed to draw from a Source of inward joy, of sympathetic and imaginative pleasure, which could be shared in by all human beings; which had no connexion with struggle or imperfection, but would be made richer by every improvement in the physical or social condition of mankind. From them I seemed to learn what would be the perennial sources of happiness, when all the greater evils of life shall have been removed. And I felt myself at once better and happier as I came under their influence.

„What is called the Law of Nations is not properly law, but a part of ethics: a set of moral rules, accepted as authoritative by civilized states.“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: What is called the Law of Nations is not properly law, but a part of ethics: a set of moral rules, accepted as authoritative by civilized states. It is true that these rules neither are nor ought to be of eternal obligation, but do and must vary more or less from age to age, as the consciences of nations become more enlightened, and the exigences of political society undergo change. But the rules mostly were at their origin, and still are, an application of the maxims of honesty and humanity to the intercourse of states. They were introduced by the moral sentiments of mankind, or by their sense of the general interest, to mitigate the crimes and sufferings of a state of war, and to restrain governments and nations from unjust or dishonest conduct towards one another in time of peace. Since every country stands in numerous and various relations with the other countries of the world, and many, our own among the number, exercise actual authority over some of these, a knowledge of the established rules of international morality is essential to the duty of every nation, and therefore of every person in it who helps to make up the nation, and whose voice and feeling form a part of what is called public opinion. Let not any one pacify his conscience by the delusion that he can do no harm if he takes no part, and forms no opinion. Bad men need nothing more to compass their ends, than that good men should look on and do nothing. He is not a good man who, without a protest, allows wrong to be committed in his name, and with the means which he helps to supply, because he will not trouble himself to use his mind on the subject. It depends on the habit of attending to and looking into public transactions, and on the degree of information and solid judgment respecting them that exists in the community, whether the conduct of the nation as a nation, both within itself and towards others, shall be selfish, corrupt, and tyrannical, or rational and enlightened, just and noble. Inaugural Address Delivered to the University of St. Andrews, Feb. 1st 1867 (1867) p. 36. http://books.google.com/books?id=DFNAAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA36

„The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not a sufficient warrant. Ch. 1: Introductory

„To do as one would be done by, and to love one's neighbour as oneself, constitute the ideal perfection of utilitarian morality.“

— John Stuart Mill
Context: In the golden rule of Jesus of Nazareth, we read the complete spirit of the ethics of utility. To do as one would be done by, and to love one's neighbour as oneself, constitute the ideal perfection of utilitarian morality. Ch. 2

Ďalší
Dnešné výročie
František Vláčil foto
František Vláčil1
1924 - 1999
Constantin Brancusi foto
Constantin Brancusi2
francúzsky umelec 1876 - 1957
André Gide foto
André Gide57
andré Gide (1893) 1869 - 1951
Umberto Eco foto
Umberto Eco16
taliansky esejista, filozof, literárny kritik a románopisec 1932 - 2016
Ďalších 17 dnešných výročie
Podobní autori
Adam Smith foto
Adam Smith13
škótsky morálny filozof a politický ekonóm
Karl Marx foto
Karl Marx44
nemecký filozof, ekonóm
John Maynard Keynes foto
John Maynard Keynes5
britský ekonóm
Heinrich Mller foto
Heinrich Mller2
nemecký publicista, literárny kritik, politický ekonóm a ...
David Hume foto
David Hume8
škótsky filozof, ekonóm a historik