Herman Melville citáty

Herman Melville foto
1  1

Herman Melville

Dátum narodenia: 1. august 1819
Dátum úmrtia: 28. september 1891

Reklama

Herman Melville bol americký prozaik, básnik a esejista, autor Bielej veľryby.

Jeho prínosom do literatúry boli diela ako Biela veľryba , Bartleby the Scrivener , Benito Cereno , Billy Budd, tento román však zostal nedokončený a bol vydaný až v roku 1924.

Keď mal okolo 20 rokov, stal sa učiteľom a neskôr námorníkom. Jeho prvá plavba viedla na Markézske ostrovy, kde aj krátku dobu žil. Prvou knihou, ktorá zobrazovala jeho vtedajší život bola kniha Taipi Omu. Táto kniha sa stala "bestsellerom" a Melville sa preslávil ako "muž, ktorý žil medzi kanibalmi". Po literárnom úspechu koncom devätnásteho storočia, prišiel neúspech v podobe diela Biela veľryba čo viedlo ku koncu jeho slávnej literárnej kariéry. Počas ďalších desaťročí Melville vydal niekoľko básnických diel, ktoré sa však preslávili až po jeho smrti. Keď v roku 1891 zomrel, Melville sa takmer úplne stratil z povedomia ľudí. Jeho návrat prišiel na začiatku dvadsiateho storočia, keď získal ocenenie za jeho tvorbu, najmä za dielo Moby Dick, ktoré bolo od vtedy vyhlásené za veľdielo, či už americkej alebo svetovej literatúry.

Citáty Herman Melville

Reklama

„It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.“

— Herman Melville
Context: It is better to fail in originality, than to succeed in imitation. He who has never failed somewhere, that man can not be great. Failure is the true test of greatness. Context: It is better to fail in originality, than to succeed in imitation. He who has never failed somewhere, that man can not be great. Failure is the true test of greatness. And if it be said, that continual success is a proof that a man wisely knows his powers, — it is only to be added, that, in that case, he knows them to be small. Let us believe it, then, once for all, that there is no hope for us in these smooth pleasing writers that know their powers.

„A smile is the chosen vehicle of all ambiguities.“

— Herman Melville, Pierre: or, the Ambiguities
Bk. IV, ch. 5

„We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men; and along these fibers, as sympathetic threads, our actions run as causes, and they come back to us as effects.“

— Herman Melville
Though this statement and a few other variants of it have been widely attributed to Herman Melville, it is actually a paraphrase of one found in a sermon of Henry Melvill, "Partaking in Other Men's Sins", St. Margaret's Church, Lothbury, England (12 June 1855), printed in Golden Lectures (1855) :

Reklama

„The symmetry of form attainable in pure fiction can not so readily be achieved in a narration essentially having less to do with fable than with fact.“

— Herman Melville
Context: The symmetry of form attainable in pure fiction can not so readily be achieved in a narration essentially having less to do with fable than with fact. Truth uncompromisingly told will always have its ragged edges... Ch. 28

„Who knows that, when men-of-war shall be no more, "White-Jacket" may not be quoted to show to the people in the Millennium what a man-of-war was? God hasten the time!“

— Herman Melville
Context: I let nothing slip, however small; and feel myself actuated by the same motive which has prompted many worthy old chroniclers, to set down the merest trifles concerning things that are destined to pass away entirely from the earth, and which, if not preserved in the nick of time, must infallibly perish from the memories of man. Who knows that this humble narrative may not hereafter prove the history of an obsolete barbarism? Who knows that, when men-of-war shall be no more, "White-Jacket" may not be quoted to show to the people in the Millennium what a man-of-war was? God hasten the time! Ch. 68

„These are the last resources of an insulted and unendurable existence.“

— Herman Melville
Context: Nature has not implanted any power in man that was not meant to be exercised at times, though too often our powers have been abused. The privilege, inborn and inalienable, that every man has of dying himself, and inflicting death upon another, was not given to us without a purpose. These are the last resources of an insulted and unendurable existence. Ch. 67

„Nature has not implanted any power in man that was not meant to be exercised at times, though too often our powers have been abused.“

— Herman Melville
Context: Nature has not implanted any power in man that was not meant to be exercised at times, though too often our powers have been abused. The privilege, inborn and inalienable, that every man has of dying himself, and inflicting death upon another, was not given to us without a purpose. These are the last resources of an insulted and unendurable existence. Ch. 67

Reklama

„It is a strange feeling — no hopelessness is in it, no despair. Content — that is it; and irresponsibility; but without licentious inclination. I speak now of my profoundest sense of being, not of an incidental feeling.“

— Herman Melville
Context: In me divine magnanimities are spontaneous and instantaneous — catch them while you can. The world goes round, and the other side comes up. So now I can't write what I felt. But I felt pantheistic then—your heart beat in my ribs and mine in yours, and both in God's. A sense of unspeakable security is in me this moment, on account of your having understood the book. I have written a wicked book, and feel spotless as the lamb. Ineffable socialities are in me. I would sit down and dine with you and all the Gods in old Rome's Pantheon. It is a strange feeling — no hopelessness is in it, no despair. Content — that is it; and irresponsibility; but without licentious inclination. I speak now of my profoundest sense of being, not of an incidental feeling. Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 1851); published in Memories of Hawthorne (1897) by Rose Hawthorne Lathrop, p. 157

„Whoever afflict us, whatever surround, Life is a voyage that's homeward-bound!“

— Herman Melville
Context: The worst of our evils we blindly inflict upon ourselves; our officers cannot remove them, even if they would. From the last ills no being can save another; therein each man must be his own saviour. For the rest, whatever befall us, let us never train our murderous guns inboard; let us not mutiny with bloody pikes in our hands. Our Lord High Admiral will yet interpose; and though long ages should elapse, and leave our wrongs unredressed, yet, shipmates and world-mates! let us never forget, that, Whoever afflict us, whatever surround, Life is a voyage that's homeward-bound! Ch. 93

„I hold it a verity, that even Shakspeare, was not a frank man to the uttermost. And, indeed, who in this intolerant universe is, or can be? But the Declaration of Independence makes a difference.“

— Herman Melville
Context: And do not think, my boy, that because I, impulsively broke forth in jubillations over Shakspeare, that, therefore, I am of the number of the snobs who burn their tuns of rancid fat at his shrine. No, I would stand afar off & alone, & burn some pure Palm oil, the product of some overtopping trunk. — I would to God Shakspeare had lived later, & promenaded in Broadway. Not that I might have had the pleasure of leaving my card for him at the Astor, or made merry with him over a bowl of the fine Duyckinck punch; but that the muzzle which all men wore on their soul in the Elizebethan day, might not have intercepted Shakspers full articulations. For I hold it a verity, that even Shakspeare, was not a frank man to the uttermost. And, indeed, who in this intolerant universe is, or can be? But the Declaration of Independence makes a difference.—There, I have driven my horse so hard that I have made my inn before sundown. Letter to Evert Augustus Duyckinck (3 March 1849); published in The Letters of Herman Melville (1960) edited by Merrell R. Davis and William H. Gilman, p. 79

„I'm not talking of Mr Emerson now — but of the whole corps of thought-divers, that have been diving & coming up again with bloodshot eyes since the world began.“

— Herman Melville
Context: I do not oscillate in Emerson's rainbow, but prefer rather to hang myself in mine own halter than swing in any other man's swing. Yet I think Emerson is more than a brilliant fellow. Be his stuff begged, borrowed, or stolen, or of his own domestic manufacture he is an uncommon man. Swear he is a humbug — then is he no common humbug. Lay it down that had not Sir Thomas Browne lived, Emerson would not have mystified — I will answer, that had not Old Zack's father begot him, old Zack would never have been the hero of Palo Alto. The truth is that we are all sons, grandsons, or nephews or great-nephews of those who go before us. No one is his own sire. — I was very agreeably disappointed in Mr Emerson. I had heard of him as full of transcendentalisms, myths & oracular gibberish; I had only glanced at a book of his once in Putnam's store — that was all I knew of him, till I heard him lecture. — To my surprise, I found him quite intelligible, tho' to say truth, they told me that that night he was unusually plain. — Now, there is a something about every man elevated above mediocrity, which is, for the most part, instinctuly perceptible. This I see in Mr Emerson. And, frankly, for the sake of the argument, let us call him a fool; — then had I rather be a fool than a wise man. —I love all men who dive. Any fish can swim near the surface, but it takes a great whale to go down stairs five miles or more; & if he don't attain the bottom, why, all the lead in Galena can't fashion the plumet that will. I'm not talking of Mr Emerson now — but of the whole corps of thought-divers, that have been diving & coming up again with bloodshot eyes since the world began. I could readily see in Emerson, notwithstanding his merit, a gaping flaw. It was, the insinuation, that had he lived in those days when the world was made, he might have offered some valuable suggestions. These men are all cracked right across the brow. And never will the pullers-down be able to cope with the builders-up. And this pulling down is easy enough — a keg of powder blew up Block's Monument — but the man who applied the match, could not, alone, build such a pile to save his soul from the shark-maw of the Devil. But enough of this Plato who talks thro' his nose. Letter to Evert Augustus Duyckinck (3 March 1849); published in The Letters of Herman Melville (1960) edited by Merrell R. Davis and William H. Gilman, p. 78; a portion of this is sometimes modernized in two ways:

Ďalší
Dnešné výročie
Milan Rúfus foto
Milan Rúfus12
slovenský básnik, prekladateľ a spisovateľ 1928 - 2009
Karl Heinrich Waggerl foto
Karl Heinrich Waggerl13
rakúsky autor 1897 - 1973
Thomas Merton foto
Thomas Merton19
kňaz a autor 1915 - 1968
Karl Barth foto
Karl Barth10
švajčiarsky protestantský teológ 1886 - 1968
Ďalšie 3 dnešné výročie
Podobní autori
John Steinbeck foto
John Steinbeck26
americký spisovateľ
Thomas Wolfe foto
Thomas Wolfe1
americký spisovateľ
Arthur Clarke foto
Arthur Clarke12
britský spisovateľ sci-fi, vedeckej literatúry, vynálezca...
Beall Sinclair Upton foto
Beall Sinclair Upton1
americký románopisec, spisovateľ, novinár, politický akti...
Nicolas Boileau-Despraux foto
Nicolas Boileau-Despraux7
francúzsky básnik a kritik
Desmond Tutu foto
Desmond Tutu3
juhoafrický kňaz, politik, arcibiskup, laureát Nobelovej ...
Robert Musil foto
Robert Musil11
rakúsky spisovateľ
Ingmar Bergmanová foto
Ingmar Bergmanová9
švédsky filmár
Claudius Claudianus foto
Claudius Claudianus11
rímsky latinský básnik
Lafayette Ronald Hubbard foto
Lafayette Ronald Hubbard10
americký autor sci-fi, filozof a zakladateľ Scientologick...