Henrik Ibsen citátov

Henrik Ibsen fotka
15   12

Henrik Ibsen

Dátum narodenia: 20. marec 1828
Dátum úmrtia: 23. máj 1906
Ďalšie mená: Henrik Johan Ibsen

Henrik Johan Ibsen bol nórsky dramatik, spisovateľ a maliar.

Citáty Henrik Ibsen

„Priatelia sú nebezpeční ani nie tak tým, čo vás nútia robiť, ako tým, v čom vám bránia.“

—  Henrik Ibsen

Potvrdené výroky
Zdroj: [KOTRMANOVÁ, Milada.: Perly ducha. Ostrava: Knižní expres, 1996 ISBN 80-902272-1-X]

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„Away with the State! I will take part in that revolution. Undermine the whole conception of a State, declare free choice and spiritual kinship to be the only all-important conditions of any union, and you will have the commencement of a liberty that is worth something.“

—  Henrik Ibsen

Letter to Georg Brandes (17 February 1871), as translated in Henrik Ibsen : Björnstjerne Björnson. Critical Studies (1899) by Georg Morris Cohen Brandes
Variant translation: The quality of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says: "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is a characteristic of the so-called state; and it is worthless.
As translated in Ibsen : The Man, His Art & His Significance (1907) by Haldane Macfall, p. 238
Variant translation: Neither moral concepts nor art forms can expect to live forever. How much are we obliged to hold on to? Who can guarantee that 2 plus 2 don't add up to 5 on Jupiter?
Kontext: He who possesses liberty otherwise than as an aspiration possesses it soulless, dead. One of the qualities of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says, "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has just lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is characteristic of the so-called State, and, as I have said, it is not a good characteristic. No doubt the franchise, self-taxation, etc., are benefits — but to whom? To the citizen, not to the individual. Now, reason does not imperatively demand that the individual should be a citizen. Far from it. The State is the curse of the individual. With what is Prussia's political strength bought? With the absorption of the individual in the political and geographical idea. The waiter is the best soldier. And on the other hand, take the Jewish people, the aristocracy of the human race — how is it they have kept their place apart, their poetical halo, amid surroundings of coarse cruelty? By having no State to burden them. Had they remained in Palestine, they would long ago have lost their individuality in the process of their State's construction, like all other nations. Away with the State! I will take part in that revolution. Undermine the whole conception of a State, declare free choice and spiritual kinship to be the only all-important conditions of any union, and you will have the commencement of a liberty that is worth something. Changes in forms of government are pettifogging affairs — a degree less or a degree more, mere foolishness. The State has its root in time, and will ripe and rot in time. Greater things than it will fall — religion, for example. Neither moral conceptions nor art-forms have an eternity before them. How much are we really in duty bound to pin our faith to? Who will guarantee me that on Jupiter two and two do not make five?

„The great secret of power is never to will to do more than you can accomplish.“

—  Henrik Ibsen

As quoted in The Ibsen Calendar : A Quotation from the Works of Henrik Ibsen for Every Day (1913) by C. A. Arfwedson
Kontext: The great secret of power is never to will to do more than you can accomplish. The great secret of action and victory is to be capable of living your life without ideals. Such is the sum of the whole world's wisdom.

„I go to scale the Future's possibilities!“

—  Henrik Ibsen, Love's Comedy

Falk, in a statement rich with ironies.
Love's Comedy (1862)
Kontext: I go to scale the Future's possibilities! Farewell!
God bless thee, bride of my life's dawn, Where'er I be, to nobler deed thou'lt wake me.

„He who possesses liberty otherwise than as an aspiration possesses it soulless, dead. One of the qualities of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding.“

—  Henrik Ibsen

Letter to Georg Brandes (17 February 1871), as translated in Henrik Ibsen : Björnstjerne Björnson. Critical Studies (1899) by Georg Morris Cohen Brandes
Variant translation: The quality of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says: "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is a characteristic of the so-called state; and it is worthless.
As translated in Ibsen : The Man, His Art & His Significance (1907) by Haldane Macfall, p. 238
Variant translation: Neither moral concepts nor art forms can expect to live forever. How much are we obliged to hold on to? Who can guarantee that 2 plus 2 don't add up to 5 on Jupiter?
Kontext: He who possesses liberty otherwise than as an aspiration possesses it soulless, dead. One of the qualities of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says, "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has just lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is characteristic of the so-called State, and, as I have said, it is not a good characteristic. No doubt the franchise, self-taxation, etc., are benefits — but to whom? To the citizen, not to the individual. Now, reason does not imperatively demand that the individual should be a citizen. Far from it. The State is the curse of the individual. With what is Prussia's political strength bought? With the absorption of the individual in the political and geographical idea. The waiter is the best soldier. And on the other hand, take the Jewish people, the aristocracy of the human race — how is it they have kept their place apart, their poetical halo, amid surroundings of coarse cruelty? By having no State to burden them. Had they remained in Palestine, they would long ago have lost their individuality in the process of their State's construction, like all other nations. Away with the State! I will take part in that revolution. Undermine the whole conception of a State, declare free choice and spiritual kinship to be the only all-important conditions of any union, and you will have the commencement of a liberty that is worth something. Changes in forms of government are pettifogging affairs — a degree less or a degree more, mere foolishness. The State has its root in time, and will ripe and rot in time. Greater things than it will fall — religion, for example. Neither moral conceptions nor art-forms have an eternity before them. How much are we really in duty bound to pin our faith to? Who will guarantee me that on Jupiter two and two do not make five?

„Neither moral conceptions nor art-forms have an eternity before them. How much are we really in duty bound to pin our faith to? Who will guarantee me that on Jupiter two and two do not make five?“

—  Henrik Ibsen

Letter to Georg Brandes (17 February 1871), as translated in Henrik Ibsen : Björnstjerne Björnson. Critical Studies (1899) by Georg Morris Cohen Brandes
Variant translation: The quality of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says: "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is a characteristic of the so-called state; and it is worthless.
As translated in Ibsen : The Man, His Art & His Significance (1907) by Haldane Macfall, p. 238
Variant translation: Neither moral concepts nor art forms can expect to live forever. How much are we obliged to hold on to? Who can guarantee that 2 plus 2 don't add up to 5 on Jupiter?
Kontext: He who possesses liberty otherwise than as an aspiration possesses it soulless, dead. One of the qualities of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says, "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has just lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is characteristic of the so-called State, and, as I have said, it is not a good characteristic. No doubt the franchise, self-taxation, etc., are benefits — but to whom? To the citizen, not to the individual. Now, reason does not imperatively demand that the individual should be a citizen. Far from it. The State is the curse of the individual. With what is Prussia's political strength bought? With the absorption of the individual in the political and geographical idea. The waiter is the best soldier. And on the other hand, take the Jewish people, the aristocracy of the human race — how is it they have kept their place apart, their poetical halo, amid surroundings of coarse cruelty? By having no State to burden them. Had they remained in Palestine, they would long ago have lost their individuality in the process of their State's construction, like all other nations. Away with the State! I will take part in that revolution. Undermine the whole conception of a State, declare free choice and spiritual kinship to be the only all-important conditions of any union, and you will have the commencement of a liberty that is worth something. Changes in forms of government are pettifogging affairs — a degree less or a degree more, mere foolishness. The State has its root in time, and will ripe and rot in time. Greater things than it will fall — religion, for example. Neither moral conceptions nor art-forms have an eternity before them. How much are we really in duty bound to pin our faith to? Who will guarantee me that on Jupiter two and two do not make five?

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Podobní autori

Bjornstjerne Bjornson fotka
Bjornstjerne Bjornson4
nórsky spisovateľ
Oscar Wilde fotka
Oscar Wilde318
írsky spisovateľ a básnik
Jaroslav Vrchlický fotka
Jaroslav Vrchlický12
český básnik, dramatik, publicista a prekladateľ
Christian Friedrich Hebbel fotka
Christian Friedrich Hebbel74
nemecký básnik a dramatik
Victor Hugo fotka
Victor Hugo88
francúzsky básnik, prozaik a dramatik
Julius Zeyer fotka
Julius Zeyer25
český básnik, dramatik, bookwriter a historickej literatúry…
Jan Neruda fotka
Jan Neruda22
český básnik, divadelný kritik, publicista a spisovateľ
Michail Jurjevič Lermontov fotka
Michail Jurjevič Lermontov12
ruský spisovateľ, básnik a maliar
Robert Browning fotka
Robert Browning6
anglický básnik a dramatik viktoriánskej éry
Hans Christian Andersen fotka
Hans Christian Andersen23
dánsky autor, autor rozprávok a básnik
Dnešné výročie
Ralph Waldo Emerson fotka
Ralph Waldo Emerson204
americký filozof, esejista a básnik 1803 - 1882
Páter Pio fotka
Páter Pio22
taliansky svätec, kňaz, stigmatik a mystik 1887 - 1968
Martin Kukučín fotka
Martin Kukučín2
slovenský prozaik, dramatik a publicista 1860 - 1928
Johann Nepomuk Nestroy fotka
Johann Nepomuk Nestroy19
rakúsky dramatik, herec a spevák 1801 - 1862
Ďalších 16 výročí
Podobní autori
Bjornstjerne Bjornson fotka
Bjornstjerne Bjornson4
nórsky spisovateľ
Oscar Wilde fotka
Oscar Wilde318
írsky spisovateľ a básnik
Jaroslav Vrchlický fotka
Jaroslav Vrchlický12
český básnik, dramatik, publicista a prekladateľ
Christian Friedrich Hebbel fotka
Christian Friedrich Hebbel74
nemecký básnik a dramatik
Victor Hugo fotka
Victor Hugo88
francúzsky básnik, prozaik a dramatik
x