Robert Browning citátov

Robert Browning fotka
6   0

Robert Browning

Dátum narodenia: 7. máj 1812
Dátum úmrtia: 12. december 1889

Reklama

Robert Browning anglický básnik.

Podobní autori

Herbert Spencer fotka
Herbert Spencer9
anglický filozof, biológ, sociológ a prominentný klasický...
William Somerset Maugham fotka
William Somerset Maugham51
britský dramatik, románopisec, rozprávač
Joseph Addison fotka
Joseph Addison23
politik, spisovateľ a dramatik
William Shakespeare fotka
William Shakespeare158
anglický dramatik a básnik
William Butler Yeats fotka
William Butler Yeats4
básnik z Írska
Vladimir Vladimirovič Majakovskij fotka
Vladimir Vladimirovič Majakovskij1
ruský a sovietska básnik, dramatik, výtvarník a divadelný...
Michail Jurjevič Lermontov fotka
Michail Jurjevič Lermontov12
ruský spisovateľ, básnik a maliar
John Milton fotka
John Milton17
anglický epický básnik
Christian Friedrich Hebbel fotka
Christian Friedrich Hebbel74
nemecký básnik a dramatik

Citáty Robert Browning

Reklama
Reklama

„Who hears music feels his solitude
Peopled at once.“

—  Robert Browning, The complete poetical works of Browning
Balaustion's Adventure, line 323 (1871).

„Each a God's germ, but doomed remain a germ
In unexpanded infancy“

—  Robert Browning
Context: Each a God's germ, but doomed remain a germ In unexpanded infancy Book the Third

„God's in His heaven—
All's right with the world!“

—  Robert Browning
Context: The year's at the spring, And day's at the morn; Morning's at seven; The hill-side's dew-pearl'd; The lark's on the wing; The snail's on the thorn; God's in His heaven— All's right with the world! Part I, line 221.

„My times be in thy hand!
Perfect the cup as planned!“

—  Robert Browning
Context: So, take, and use thy work: Amend what flaws may lurk, What strain o' the stuff, what warpings past the aim! My times be in thy hand! Perfect the cup as planned! Let age approve of youth, and death complete the same! Line 187.

Reklama

„Rather I prize the doubt
Low kinds exist without,
Finished and finite clods, untroubled by a spark.“

—  Robert Browning
Context: Mine be some figured flame which blends, transcends them all! Not for such hopes and fears Annulling youth's brief years, Do I remonstrate: folly wide the mark! Rather I prize the doubt Low kinds exist without, Finished and finite clods, untroubled by a spark. Poor vaunt of life indeed, Were man but formed to feed On joy, to solely seek and find and feast; Such feasting ended, then As sure an end to men. Line 12.

„He gathers earth's whole good into his arms;
Standing, as man now, stately, strong and wise,
Marching to fortune, not surprised by her.“

—  Robert Browning
Context: p>He gathers earth's whole good into his arms; Standing, as man now, stately, strong and wise, Marching to fortune, not surprised by her. One great aim, like a guiding-star, above— Which tasks strength, wisdom, stateliness, to lift His manhood to the height that takes the prize; A prize not near — lest overlooking earth He rashly spring to seize it — nor remote, So that he rest upon his path content: But day by day, while shimmering grows shine, And the faint circlet prophesies the orb, He sees so much as, just evolving these, The stateliness, the wisdom and the strength, To due completion, will suffice this life, And lead him at his grandest to the grave. After this star, out of a night he springs; A beggar's cradle for the throne of thrones He quits; so, mounting, feels each step he mounts, Nor, as from each to each exultingly He passes, overleaps one grade of joy. This, for his own good: — with the world, each gift Of God and man, — reality, tradition, Fancy and fact — so well environ him, That as a mystic panoply they serve — Of force, untenanted, to awe mankind, And work his purpose out with half the world, While he, their master, dexterously slipt From such encumbrance, is meantime employed With his own prowess on the other half. Thus shall he prosper, every day's success Adding, to what is he, a solid strength — An aery might to what encircles him, Till at the last, so life's routine lends help, That as the Emperor only breathes and moves, His shadow shall be watched, his step or stalk Become a comfort or a portent, how He trails his ermine take significance, — Till even his power shall cease to be most power, And men shall dread his weakness more, nor dare Peril their earth its bravest, first and best, Its typified invincibility.Thus shall he go on, greatening, till he ends— The man of men, the spirit of all flesh, The fiery centre of an earthly world!</p Valence of Prince Berthold, in Act IV.

„Thus shall he go on, greatening, till he ends—
The man of men, the spirit of all flesh,
The fiery centre of an earthly world!“

—  Robert Browning
Context: p>He gathers earth's whole good into his arms; Standing, as man now, stately, strong and wise, Marching to fortune, not surprised by her. One great aim, like a guiding-star, above— Which tasks strength, wisdom, stateliness, to lift His manhood to the height that takes the prize; A prize not near — lest overlooking earth He rashly spring to seize it — nor remote, So that he rest upon his path content: But day by day, while shimmering grows shine, And the faint circlet prophesies the orb, He sees so much as, just evolving these, The stateliness, the wisdom and the strength, To due completion, will suffice this life, And lead him at his grandest to the grave. After this star, out of a night he springs; A beggar's cradle for the throne of thrones He quits; so, mounting, feels each step he mounts, Nor, as from each to each exultingly He passes, overleaps one grade of joy. This, for his own good: — with the world, each gift Of God and man, — reality, tradition, Fancy and fact — so well environ him, That as a mystic panoply they serve — Of force, untenanted, to awe mankind, And work his purpose out with half the world, While he, their master, dexterously slipt From such encumbrance, is meantime employed With his own prowess on the other half. Thus shall he prosper, every day's success Adding, to what is he, a solid strength — An aery might to what encircles him, Till at the last, so life's routine lends help, That as the Emperor only breathes and moves, His shadow shall be watched, his step or stalk Become a comfort or a portent, how He trails his ermine take significance, — Till even his power shall cease to be most power, And men shall dread his weakness more, nor dare Peril their earth its bravest, first and best, Its typified invincibility.Thus shall he go on, greatening, till he ends— The man of men, the spirit of all flesh, The fiery centre of an earthly world!</p Valence of Prince Berthold, in Act IV.

„Gold as it was, is, shall be evermore:
Prime nature with an added artistry —
No carat lost, and you have gained a ring.“

—  Robert Browning
Context: Gold as it was, is, shall be evermore: Prime nature with an added artistry — No carat lost, and you have gained a ring. What of it? 'T is a figure, a symbol, say; A thing's sign: now for the thing signified. Book I : The Ring and the Book.

Ďalšie
Dnešné výročie
Pearl S.  Buck fotka
Pearl S. Buck22
americká spisovateľka 1892 - 1973
Antoine de Rivarol fotka
Antoine de Rivarol7
francúzsky spisovateľ 1753 - 1801
Hans Urs Von Balthasar fotka
Hans Urs Von Balthasar43
švédsky katolícky teológ 1905 - 1988
Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer fotka
Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer52
španielsky teológ 1902 - 1975
Ďalších 20 výročí
Podobní autori
Herbert Spencer fotka
Herbert Spencer9
anglický filozof, biológ, sociológ a prominentný klasický...
William Somerset Maugham fotka
William Somerset Maugham51
britský dramatik, románopisec, rozprávač
Joseph Addison fotka
Joseph Addison23
politik, spisovateľ a dramatik
William Shakespeare fotka
William Shakespeare158
anglický dramatik a básnik
William Butler Yeats fotka
William Butler Yeats4
básnik z Írska