Nathaniel Hawthorne citátov

Nathaniel Hawthorne fotka
1   16

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Dátum narodenia: 4. júl 1804
Dátum úmrtia: 19. máj 1864

Reklama

Nathaniel Hawthorne bol americký spisovateľ, jeden z predstaviteľov tzv. subžánru "temný romantizmus". Písal poviedky a romány. Jeho najznámejším dielom je román Šarlátové písmeno, ktoré zobrazuje obdobie najprísnejšieho puritánstva v prvých amerických kolóniách.

Podobní autori

Heinrich Böll fotka
Heinrich Böll11
nemecký spisovateľ, románopisec a novelista
Léon Bloy fotka
Léon Bloy16
francúzsky spisovateľ, básnik a esejista
Henry Adams fotka
Henry Adams13
novinár, historik, akademik, románopisec
 O`Henry fotka
O`Henry12
americký novelista
Giovanni Papini fotka
Giovanni Papini1
taliansky spisovateľ
Henry De Montherlant fotka
Henry De Montherlant24
francúzsky spisovateľ
Remy de Gourmont fotka
Remy de Gourmont8
francúzsky spisovateľ
Thornton Niven Wilder fotka
Thornton Niven Wilder10
americký dramatik a románopisec
Thomas Wolfe fotka
Thomas Wolfe2
americký spisovateľ

Citáty Nathaniel Hawthorne

Reklama

„I have not lived, but only dreamed about living.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Letter to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (4 June 1837)

„Easy reading is damn hard writing.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Also attributed to Ernest Hemingway and others; the earliest definite occurrence of this yet found in research for Wikiquote is by Maya Angelou, who stated it in Conversations With Maya Angelou (1989) edited by Jeffrey M. Elliot:

Reklama

„A high truth, indeed, fairly, finely, and skilfully wrought out, brightening at every step, and crowning the final development of a work of fiction, may add an artistic glory, but is never any truer, and seldom any more evident, at the last page than at the first.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Context: Many writers lay very great stress upon some definite moral purpose, at which they profess to aim their works. Not to be deficient in this particular, the author has provided himself with a moral, — the truth, namely, that the wrong-doing of one generation lives into the successive ones, and, divesting itself of every temporary advantage, becomes a pure and uncontrollable mischief; and he would feel it a singular gratification if this romance might effectually convince mankind — or, indeed, any one man — of the folly of tumbling down an avalanche of ill-gotten gold, or real estate, on the heads of an unfortunate posterity, thereby to maim and crush them, until the accumulated mass shall be scattered abroad in its original atoms. In good faith, however, he is not sufficiently imaginative to flatter himself with the slightest hope of this kind. When romances do really teach anything, or produce any effective operation, it is usually through a far more subtile process than the ostensible one. The author has considered it hardly worth his while, therefore, relentlessly to impale the story with its moral as with an iron rod, — or, rather, as by sticking a pin through a butterfly, — thus at once depriving it of life, and causing it to stiffen in an ungainly and unnatural attitude. A high truth, indeed, fairly, finely, and skilfully wrought out, brightening at every step, and crowning the final development of a work of fiction, may add an artistic glory, but is never any truer, and seldom any more evident, at the last page than at the first. Preface

„Long, long may it be, ere he comes again! His hour is one of darkness, and adversity, and peril.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Context: Long, long may it be, ere he comes again! His hour is one of darkness, and adversity, and peril. But should domestic tyranny oppress us, or the invader's step pollute our soil, still may the Gray Champion come, for he is the type of New England's hereditary spirit; and his shadowy march, on the eve of danger, must ever be the pledge, that New England's sons will vindicate their ancestry. "The Gray Champion" (1835) from Twice Told Tales (1837, 1851)

„The moment when a man's head drops off is seldom or never, I am inclined to think, precisely the most agreeable of his life.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Context: The moment when a man's head drops off is seldom or never, I am inclined to think, precisely the most agreeable of his life. Nevertheless, like the greater part of our misfortunes, even so serious a contingency brings its remedy and consolation with it, if the sufferer will but make the best, rather than the worst, of the accident which has befallen him. Introduction: The Custom-House

Reklama

„In old times, the settlers used to be astounded by the inroads of the northern Indians, coming down upon them from this mountain rampart, through some defile known only to themselves. It is indeed a wondrous path.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Context: In old times, the settlers used to be astounded by the inroads of the northern Indians, coming down upon them from this mountain rampart, through some defile known only to themselves. It is indeed a wondrous path. A demon, it might be fancied, or one of the Titans, was travelling up the valley, elbowing the heights carelessly aside as he passed, till at length a great mountain took its stand directly across his intended road. He tarries not for such an obstacle, but rending it asunder, a thousand feet from peak to base, discloses its treasures of hidden minerals, its sunless waters, all the secrets of the mountain's inmost heart, with a mighty fracture of rugged precipices on each side. This is the Notch of the White Hills. Shame on me, that I have attempted to describe it by so mean an image — feeling, as I do, that it is one of those symbolic scenes, which lead the mind to the sentiment, though not to the conception, of Omnipotence. "Sketches from Memory": The Notch of the White Mountains (1835)

„Holligsworth would have gone with me to the hither verge of life, and have sent his friendly and hopeful accents far over on the other side, while I should be treading the unknown path.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Context: Hollingworth's more than brotherly attendance gave me inexpressible comfort. Most men - and certainly I could not always claim to be one of the exceptions - have a natural indifference, if not an absolute hostile feeling, towards those whose disease, or weakness, or calamity of any kind causes to falter or faint among the rude jostle of our existence. The education of Christianity, it is true, the sympathy of a like experience and the example of women, may soften and, possibly, subvert this ugly characteristic of our sex; but it is originally there, and has likewise its analogy in the practice of our brute brethren, who hunt the sick and disabled member of the herd from among them, as an enemy. It is for this reason that the stricken deer goes apart, and the sick lion grimly withdraws into his den. Except in love, or the attachments of kindred, or other very long and habitual affection, we really have no tenderness. But there was something of the woman moulded into the great, stalwart frame of Holligsworth; nor was he ashamed of it, as men often are of what is best in them, nor seemed ever to know that there was such a soft place in his heart. I knew it well, however, at that time, although afterwards it came nigh to be forgotten. Methought there could not be two such men alive as Holligsworth. There never was any blaze of a fireside that warmed and cheered me, in the down—sinkings and shiverings of my spirit, so effectually as did the light out of those eyes, which lay so deep and dark under his shaggy brows. Happy the man that has such a friend beside him when he comes to die!... How many men, I wonder, does one meet with in a lifetime, whom he would choose for his deathbed companions! It still impresses me as almost a matter of regret that I did not die then, when I had tolerably made up my mind to it; for Holligsworth would have gone with me to the hither verge of life, and have sent his friendly and hopeful accents far over on the other side, while I should be treading the unknown path.

„As far as my experience goes, men of genius are fairly gifted with the social qualities; and in this age, there appears to be a fellow-feeling among them, which had not heretofore been developed.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Context: As far as my experience goes, men of genius are fairly gifted with the social qualities; and in this age, there appears to be a fellow-feeling among them, which had not heretofore been developed. As men, they ask nothing better than to be on equal terms with their fellow-men; and as authors, they have thrown aside their proverbial jealousy, and acknowledge a generous brotherhood. "The Hall of Fantasy" (1843)

„Many writers lay very great stress upon some definite moral purpose, at which they profess to aim their works.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Context: Many writers lay very great stress upon some definite moral purpose, at which they profess to aim their works. Not to be deficient in this particular, the author has provided himself with a moral, — the truth, namely, that the wrong-doing of one generation lives into the successive ones, and, divesting itself of every temporary advantage, becomes a pure and uncontrollable mischief; and he would feel it a singular gratification if this romance might effectually convince mankind — or, indeed, any one man — of the folly of tumbling down an avalanche of ill-gotten gold, or real estate, on the heads of an unfortunate posterity, thereby to maim and crush them, until the accumulated mass shall be scattered abroad in its original atoms. In good faith, however, he is not sufficiently imaginative to flatter himself with the slightest hope of this kind. When romances do really teach anything, or produce any effective operation, it is usually through a far more subtile process than the ostensible one. The author has considered it hardly worth his while, therefore, relentlessly to impale the story with its moral as with an iron rod, — or, rather, as by sticking a pin through a butterfly, — thus at once depriving it of life, and causing it to stiffen in an ungainly and unnatural attitude. A high truth, indeed, fairly, finely, and skilfully wrought out, brightening at every step, and crowning the final development of a work of fiction, may add an artistic glory, but is never any truer, and seldom any more evident, at the last page than at the first. Preface

Ďalšie
Dnešné výročie
Raymond Radiguet fotka
Raymond Radiguet1
francúzsky spisovateľ 1903 - 1923
Georgi Dimitrov fotka
Georgi Dimitrov
1882 - 1949
Maxim Gorkij fotka
Maxim Gorkij82
ruský spisovateľ 1868 - 1936
Sigmund Graff fotka
Sigmund Graff36
nemecký spisovateľ a novinár 1898 - 1979
Ďalších 13 výročí
Podobní autori
Heinrich Böll fotka
Heinrich Böll11
nemecký spisovateľ, románopisec a novelista
Léon Bloy fotka
Léon Bloy16
francúzsky spisovateľ, básnik a esejista
Henry Adams fotka
Henry Adams13
novinár, historik, akademik, románopisec
 O`Henry fotka
O`Henry12
americký novelista