„He could snap the golden chain
With one toss of his mane,
If he chose to move,
If he chose to prove
His liberty.“

The Unicorn in Captivity (1955)
Kontext: Here sits the Unicorn;
Leashed by a chain of gold
To the pomengranate tree.
So light a chain to hold
So fierce a beast;
Delicate as a cross at rest
On a maiden's breast.
He could snap the golden chain
With one toss of his mane,
If he chose to move,
If he chose to prove
His liberty.
But he does not choose
What choice would lose.
He stays, the Unicorn,
In captivity.

Prevzaté z Wikiquote. Posledná aktualizácia 3. jún 2021. História

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