„The observer (poor soul, with his documents!) is all abroad. For to look at the man is but to court deception.“

—  Robert Louis Stevenson, kniha Across the Plains

Zdroj: Across the Plains (1892), Ch. VII, The Lantern-Bearers.
Kontext: The observer (poor soul, with his documents!) is all abroad. For to look at the man is but to court deception. We shall see the trunk from which he draws his nourishment; but he himself is above and abroad in the green dome of foliage, hummed through by winds and nested in by nightingales. And the true realism were that of the poets, to climb up after him like a squirrel, and catch some glimpse of the heaven for which he lives. And, the true realism, always and everywhere, is that of the poets: to find out where joy resides, and give it a voice far beyond singing. For to miss the joy is to miss all. In the joy of the actors lies the sense of any action.

Posledná aktualizácia 23. jún 2020. Histórie
Robert Louis Stevenson fotka
Robert Louis Stevenson16
škótsky románopisec, básnik, esejista a autor cestopisov 1850 - 1894

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