„The lonesomest thing in all the world is a soul when it is making ready to go on its mysterious, far journey.“

—  O`Henry, "The Last Leaf"
 O`Henry fotka
O`Henry11
americký novelista 1862 - 1910
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Girolamo Gigli fotka

„Heaven is always ready to shut its eyes to our sins when they are not committed before the eyes of the world, and when the lack of witnesses makes it impossible to bring the charge home to us.“

—  Girolamo Gigli Italian dramaturge 1660 - 1722
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Rabindranath Tagore fotka

„The human soul is on its journey from the law to love, from discipline to liberation, from the moral plane to the spiritual.“

—  Rabindranath Tagore Bengali polymath 1861 - 1941
Context: The human soul is on its journey from the law to love, from discipline to liberation, from the moral plane to the spiritual. Buddha preached the discipline of self-restraint and moral life; it is a complete acceptance of law. But this bondage of law cannot be an end by itself; by mastering it thoroughly we acquire the means of getting beyond it. It is going back to Brahma, to the infinite love, which is manifesting itself through the finite forms of law.

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Albert Einstein fotka

„One may say "the eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility."“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
From the article "Physics and Reality" (March 1936), reprinted in Out of My Later Years (1956). The quotation marks may just indicate that he wants to present this as a new aphorism, but it could possibly indicate that he is paraphrasing or quoting someone else — perhaps Immanuel Kant, since in the next sentence he says "It is one of the great realizations of Immanuel Kant that the setting up of a real external world would be senseless without this comprehensibility." Other variants: The eternally incomprehensible thing about the world is its comprehensibility. In the endnotes to Einstein: His Life and Universe by Walter Isaacson, note 46 on p. 628 http://books.google.com/books?id=cdxWNE7NY6QC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA628#v=onepage&q&f=false says that "Gerald Holton says that this is more properly translated" as the variant above, citing Holton's essay "What Precisely is Thinking?" on p. 161 of Einstein: A Centenary Volume edited by Anthony Philip French. The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is comprehensible. This version was given in Einstein: A Biography (1954) by Antonina Vallentin, p. 24, and widely quoted afterwards. Vallentin cites "Physics and Reality" in Journal of the Franklin Institute (March 1936), and is possibly giving a variant translation as with Holton. The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is at all comprehensible. As quoted in Speaking of Science (2000) by Michael Fripp The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility … The fact that it is comprehensible is a miracle. As quoted in Einstein: His Life and Universe by Walter Isaacson, p. 462 http://books.google.com/books?id=cdxWNE7NY6QC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA462#v=onepage&q&f=false. In the original essay "The fact that it is comprehensible is a miracle" appears at the end of the paragraph that follows the paragraph in which "The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility" appears.