„Discoveries in physics are made when the time for making them is ripe, and not before.“

[Davisson, Clinton, The Discovery of Electron Waves, Nobel Lectures, Physics 1922-1941, http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1937/davisson-lecture.html, Amsterdam, Elsevier Publishing Company (1965), 1937]

Posledná aktualizácia 22. máj 2020. Histórie
Clinton Davisson fotka
Clinton Davisson
americký fyzik 1881 - 1958

Podobné citáty

„In ancient times all things were cheape
'Tis good to look before you leape
When come is ripe 'tis time to reape.“

—  Martin Parker English ballad writer 1624 - 1647

The Roxburghe Ballads (c. 1630), reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

Angelina Jolie fotka
Henrik Ibsen fotka

„The State has its root in time, and will ripe and rot in time.“

—  Henrik Ibsen Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet 1828 - 1906

Letter to Georg Brandes (17 February 1871), as translated in Henrik Ibsen : Björnstjerne Björnson. Critical Studies (1899) by Georg Morris Cohen Brandes
Variant translation: The quality of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says: "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is a characteristic of the so-called state; and it is worthless.
As translated in Ibsen : The Man, His Art & His Significance (1907) by Haldane Macfall, p. 238
Variant translation: Neither moral concepts nor art forms can expect to live forever. How much are we obliged to hold on to? Who can guarantee that 2 plus 2 don't add up to 5 on Jupiter?
Kontext: He who possesses liberty otherwise than as an aspiration possesses it soulless, dead. One of the qualities of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says, "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has just lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is characteristic of the so-called State, and, as I have said, it is not a good characteristic. No doubt the franchise, self-taxation, etc., are benefits — but to whom? To the citizen, not to the individual. Now, reason does not imperatively demand that the individual should be a citizen. Far from it. The State is the curse of the individual. With what is Prussia's political strength bought? With the absorption of the individual in the political and geographical idea. The waiter is the best soldier. And on the other hand, take the Jewish people, the aristocracy of the human race — how is it they have kept their place apart, their poetical halo, amid surroundings of coarse cruelty? By having no State to burden them. Had they remained in Palestine, they would long ago have lost their individuality in the process of their State's construction, like all other nations. Away with the State! I will take part in that revolution. Undermine the whole conception of a State, declare free choice and spiritual kinship to be the only all-important conditions of any union, and you will have the commencement of a liberty that is worth something. Changes in forms of government are pettifogging affairs — a degree less or a degree more, mere foolishness. The State has its root in time, and will ripe and rot in time. Greater things than it will fall — religion, for example. Neither moral conceptions nor art-forms have an eternity before them. How much are we really in duty bound to pin our faith to? Who will guarantee me that on Jupiter two and two do not make five?

Austen Henry Layard fotka
Umberto Eco fotka

„Fear prophets, Adso, and those prepared to die for the truth, for as a rule they make many others die with them, often before them, at times instead of them.“

—  Umberto Eco, kniha The Name of the Rose

Temi, Adso, i profeti e coloro disposti a morire per la verità, ché di solito fan morire moltissimo con loro, spesso prima di loro, talvolta al posto loro.
William of Baskerville http://books.google.com/books?id=XY2vXKsHbzIC&q="Fear+prophets+adso+and+those+prepared+to+die+for+the+truth+for+as+a+rule+they+make+many+others+die+with+them+often+before+them+at+times+instead+of+them"&pg=PA549#v=onepage
Zdroj: The Name of the Rose (1980)

John Dewey fotka
Bertrand Russell fotka
Joseph Silk fotka
Friedrich Engels fotka

„History has proved us, and all who thought like us, wrong. It has made it clear that the state of economic development on the Continent at that time [1848] was not, by a long way, ripe for the removal of capitalist production.“

—  Friedrich Engels German social scientist, author, political theorist, and philosopher 1820 - 1895

Introduction (1895) https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1850/class-struggles-france/intro.htm to Marx's The Class Struggles in France (1848-50)

Wassily Kandinsky fotka
Jeff Lindsay fotka
Paul Karl Feyerabend fotka

„At all times man approached his surroundings with wide open senses and a fertile intelligence, at all times he made incredible discoveries, at all times we can learn from his ideas.“

—  Paul Karl Feyerabend, kniha Against Method

Pg. 306-307
Against Method (1975)
Kontext: Combining this observation with the insight that science has no special method, we arrive at the result that the separation of science and non-science is not only artificial but also detrimental to the advancement of knowledge. If we want to understand nature, if we want to master our physical surroundings, then we must use all ideas, all methods, and not just a small selection of them. The assertion, however, that there is no knowledge outside science - extra scientiam nulla salus - is nothing but another and most convenient fairy-tale. Primitive tribes has more detailed classifications of animals and plant than contemporary scientific zoology and botany, they know remedies whose effectiveness astounds physicians (while the pharmaceutical industry already smells here a new source of income), they have means of influencing their fellow men which science for a long time regarded as non-existent (voodoo), they solve difficult problems in ways which are still not quite understood (building of the pyramids; Polynesian travels), there existed a highly developed and internationally known astronomy in the old Stone Age, this astronomy was factually adequate as well as emotionally satisfying, it solved both physical and social problems (one cannot say the same about modern astronomy) and it was tested in very simple and ingenious ways (stone observatories in England and in the South Pacific; astronomical schools in Polynesia - for a more details treatment an references concerning all these assertions cf. my Einfuhrung in die Naturphilosophie). There was the domestication of animals, the invention of rotating agriculture, new types of plants were bred and kept pure by careful avoidance of cross fertilization, we have chemical inventions, we have a most amazing art that can compare with the best achievement of the present. True, there were no collective excursions to the moon, but single individuals, disregarding great dangers to their soul and their sanity, rose from sphere to sphere to sphere until they finally faced God himself in all His splendor while others changed into animals and back into humans again. At all times man approached his surroundings with wide open senses and a fertile intelligence, at all times he made incredible discoveries, at all times we can learn from his ideas.

Gianfranco Fini fotka

„Times are ripe to discuss about the vote right, at least on an administrative level, for immigrant persons.“

—  Gianfranco Fini Italian politician 1952

Corriere della Sera, Fini: diamo il diritto di voto agli immigrati http://www.corriere.it/Primo_Piano/Politica/2003/10_Ottobre/07/fini.shtml, 7 October 2003.

Robert A. Heinlein fotka
Marcus Aurelius fotka
Thomas Paine fotka

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