„And just as he who, with exhausted breath,
having escaped from the sea to shore,
turns to the perilous waters and gazes.“

—  Dante Alighieri, kniha Inferno

Canto I, lines 22–24 (tr. Mandelbaum).
The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Inferno

Originál

E come quei che con lena affannata, uscito fuor del pelago a la riva, si volge a l'acqua perigliosa e guata.

The Divine Comedy (c. 1308–1321), Inferno

Prevzaté z Wikiquote. Posledná aktualizácia 3. jún 2021. História
Dante Alighieri fotka
Dante Alighieri12
taliansky básnik 1265 - 1321

Podobné citáty

Lucretius fotka

„Pleasant it is, when over a great sea the winds trouble the waters, to gaze from shore upon another's great tribulation: not because any man's troubles are a delectable joy, but because to perceive from what ills you are free yourself is pleasant.“

—  Lucretius Roman poet and philosopher -94 - -55 pred n. l.

Book II, lines 1–4 (tr. Rouse)
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things)
Originál: (la) Suave mari magno turbantibus aequora ventis
e terra magnum alterius spectare laborem;
non quia vexari quemquamst jucunda voluptas,
sed quibus ipse malis careas quia cernere suave est.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow fotka
T.S. Eliot fotka
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow fotka
Gustav Hasford fotka
Kóbó Abe fotka
Letitia Elizabeth Landon fotka
T.C. Boyle fotka
Zora Neale Hurston fotka

„Love is like the sea. It's a moving thing, but still and all, it takes its shape from the shore it meets, and it's different with every shore.“

—  Zora Neale Hurston, kniha Their Eyes Were Watching God

Varianta: Love is lak de sea. It’s uh movin’ thing, but still and all, it takes its shape from de shore it meets, and it’s different with every shore.
Zdroj: Their Eyes Were Watching God

Mwanandeke Kindembo fotka
Robin McKinley fotka
Silius Italicus fotka

„When Hannibal's eyes were sated with the picture of all that valour, he saw next a marvellous sight—the sea suddenly flung upon the land with the mass of the rising deep, and no encircling shores, and the fields inundated by the invading waters. For, where Nereus rolls forth from his blue caverns and churns up the waters of Neptune from the bottom, the sea rushes forward in flood, and Ocean, opening his hidden springs, rushes on with furious waves. Then the water, as if stirred to the depths by the fierce trident, strives to cover the land with the swollen sea. But soon the water turns and glides back with ebbing tide; and then the ships, robbed of the sea, are stranded, and the sailors, lying on their benches, await the waters' return. It is the Moon that stirs this realm of wandering Cymothoe and troubles the deep; the Moon, driving her chariot through the sky, draws the sea this way and that, and Tethys follows with ebb and flow.“

—  Silius Italicus, Punica

Postquam oculos varia implevit virtutis imago,
mira dehinc cernit: surgentis mole profundi
injectum terris subitum mare nullaque circa
litora et infuso stagnantis aequore campos.
nam qua caeruleis Nereus evoluitur antris
atque imo freta contorquet Neptunia fundo,
proruptum exundat pelagus, caecosque relaxans
Oceanus fontis torrentibus ingruit undis.
tum uada, ceu saevo penitus permota tridenti,
luctantur terris tumefactum imponere pontum.
mox remeat gurges tractoque relabitur aestu,
ac ratis erepto campis deserta profundo,
et fusi transtris expectant aequora nautae.
Cymothoes ea regna vagae pelagique labores
Luna mouet, Luna, immissis per caerula bigis,
fertque refertque fretum, sequiturque reciproca Tethys.
Book III, lines 45–60
Punica
Originál: (la) Postquam oculos varia implevit virtutis imago,
mira dehinc cernit: surgentis mole profundi
injectum terris subitum mare nullaque circa
litora et infuso stagnantis aequore campos.
nam qua caeruleis Nereus evoluitur antris
atque imo freta contorquet Neptunia fundo,
proruptum exundat pelagus, caecosque relaxans
Oceanus fontis torrentibus ingruit undis.
tum uada, ceu saevo penitus permota tridenti,
luctantur terris tumefactum imponere pontum.
mox remeat gurges tractoque relabitur aestu,
ac ratis erepto campis deserta profundo,
et fusi transtris expectant aequora nautae.
Cymothoes ea regna vagae pelagique labores
Luna mouet, Luna, immissis per caerula bigis,
fertque refertque fretum, sequiturque reciproca Tethys.

Adolf Eichmann fotka
Menotti Lerro fotka
William Shakespeare fotka
Richard Wilbur fotka
Homér fotka

„Along the shore of the loud-roaring sea.“

—  Homér, Iliad

I. 34.
Iliad (c. 750 BC)
Originál: (el) Παρὰ θῖνα πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης.

Amit Chaudhuri fotka
T.S. Eliot fotka

„Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality.“

—  T.S. Eliot, kniha Tradition and the Individual Talent

Tradition and the Individual Talent (1919)
Kontext: The bad poet is usually unconscious where he ought to be conscious, and conscious where he ought to be unconscious. Both errors tend to make him "personal." Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things.

Súvisiace témy