„Many a man can save himself if he admits he's done wrong and takes his punishment.“

Torvald Helmer, Act I
A Doll's House (1879)

Posledná aktualizácia 22. máj 2020. Histórie
Henrik Ibsen fotka
Henrik Ibsen15
nórsky dramatik, divadelný režisér a básnik 1828 - 1906

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„The great problem of man, how to live in conscioues harmony with himself, with his neighbor, and with the whole to which he belongs, admits of as many solutions as there are provinces in our Father's kingdom; and it is in this, and not in the material sphere, that individuals and nations display their divergences of character.“

—  Theodor Mommsen German classical scholar, historian, jurist, journalist, politician, archaeologist and writer 1817 - 1903

Vol. 1, pt. 1, Chapter 2: "Into Italy" Translated by W.P.Dickson.
The History of Rome - Volume 1
Kontext: The great problem of man, how to live in conscioues harmony with himself, with his neighbor, and with the whole to which he belongs, admits of as many solutions as there are provinces in our Father's kingdom; and it is in this, and not in the material sphere, that individuals and nations display their divergences of character. The exciting causes which gave rise to this intrinsic contrast must have been in the Græco-Italian period as yet wanting; it was not until the Hellenes and Italians separated that deep-seated diversity of mental character became manifest, the effects of which contiue to the present day. The family and the state, religion and art, received in Italy and in Greece respectively a development so peculiar and so thoroughly national, that the common basis, on which in these respects also the two peoples rested, has been so overgrown as to be almost concealed from our view. That Hellenic character, which sacrificed the whole to its individual elements, the nation to the single state, and the single state to the citizen; whose ideal of life was the beautiful and the good; and, only too often, the pleasure of idleness; whose political development consisted in intensifying the original individualism of the several cantons, and subsequently led to the internal dissolution of the authority of the state; whose view of religion first invested its gods with human attributes, and then denied their existence; which gave full play to the limbs in the sports of the naked youth, and gave free scope to thought in all its grandeur and in all its awefulness;- and taht Roman character, which solemnly bound the son to reverence the father, the citizen to reverence the ruler, and all to reverence the gods; which required nothing; and honoured nothing, but the useful act, and compelled every citizen to fill up every moment of his brief life with unceasing work; which made it a duty even in the boy to modestly to cover the body; which deemed every one a bad citizen who wished to be different from his fellows; which viewed the states as all in all, and a desire for the state's extension as the only aspiration not liable to censure,- who can in thought trace back these sharply-marked contrasts to that original unity which embraced them both, prepared the way for their development, and at length produced them?

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„The superior man examines his heart, that there may be nothing wrong there, and that he may have no cause for dissatisfaction with himself.“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 pred n. l.

The Analects, The Doctrine of the Mean
Kontext: The superior man examines his heart, that there may be nothing wrong there, and that he may have no cause for dissatisfaction with himself. That wherein the superior man cannot be equaled is simply this — his work which other men cannot see.

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„Many a time a man cannot be such as he would be, if circumstances do not admit of it.“

—  Terence, Heauton Timorumenos

Act IV, scene 1, line 53 (666).
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„He admitted all the wrong that had ever been done. But he showed how, out of the wrong and the right, the suffering and the starvations, something new had come. And everybody had played a part in it, even the traitors.“

—  Stephen Vincent Benét, kniha The Devil and Daniel Webster

The Devil and Daniel Webster (1937)
Kontext: He started off in a low voice, though you could hear every word. They say he could call on the harps of the blessed when he chose. And this was just as simple and easy as a man could talk. But he didn't start out by condemning or reviling. He was talking about the things that make a country a country, and a man a man.
And he began with the simple things that everybody's known and felt — the freshness of a fine morning when you're young, and the taste of food when you're hungry, and the new day that's every day when you're a child. He took them up and he turned them in his hands. They were good things for any man. But without freedom, they sickened. And when he talked of those enslaved, and the sorrows of slavery, his voice got like a big bell. He talked of the early days of America and the men who had made those days. It wasn't a spread-eagle speech, but he made you see it. He admitted all the wrong that had ever been done. But he showed how, out of the wrong and the right, the suffering and the starvations, something new had come. And everybody had played a part in it, even the traitors.

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„He who does not punish evil commands it to be done.“

—  Leonardo Da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath 1452 - 1519

Chi non punisce il male comanda che si faccia.
XIX Philosophical Maxims. Morals. Polemics and Speculations.
Varianta: He who does not punish evil commands it to be done.

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„Every man has his own circle composed of trees, animals, men, ideas, and he is in duty bound to save this circle. He, and no one else. If he does not save it, he cannot be saved.“

—  Nikos Kazantzakis, kniha The Saviors of God

The Saviors of God (1923)
Kontext: Every man has his own circle composed of trees, animals, men, ideas, and he is in duty bound to save this circle. He, and no one else. If he does not save it, he cannot be saved.
These are the labors each man is given and is in duty bound to complete before he dies. He may not otherwise be saved. For his own soul is scattered and enslaved in these things about him, in trees, in animals, in men, in ideas, and it is his own soul he saves by completing these labors.

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„Honest Toad was always ready to admit himself in the wrong.“

—  Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

Zdroj: The Wind in the Willows (1908), Ch. 8, "Toad's Adventures"

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