„The Reality? Is it then so certain that Life is made of four Absurdities?
Is it not far more certain that life is made up of Four Beauties
of Calmness, Joy, Harmony, Rhythm…
The truest reality.
And what of the expression of all this — Art?
Must Pandemonium and Ugliness ever stand for Strength?“

Introduction to Isadora Duncan : Six Movement Designs (1906)
Quote

Prevzaté z Wikiquote. Posledná aktualizácia 3. jún 2021. História

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