„There were no sounds of men, here; only the whisperings of the world of nature, which men often called silence.“

Zdroj: World Without End (1995), Chapter 39 (pp. 562-563)

Posledná aktualizácia 4. jún 2020. Histórie
Sean Russell fotka
Sean Russell39
author 1952

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