„I wish either my father or my mother, or indeed both of them, as they were in duty both equally bound to it, had minded what they were about when they begot me.“

—  Laurence Sterne, kniha The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Book I (1760), Ch. 1.
The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1760-1767)

Laurence Sterne fotka
Laurence Sterne5
írsky / anglický spisovateľ 1713 - 1768

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„All of my decisions I made when I was a kid were decisions, would my mother and father be proud of.“

—  Ken Venturi Professional golfer 1931 - 2013

Interview Ken Venturi http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=5285, Kemper Insurance Open, Potomac, Maryland. ASAP Sports - Golf, June 3, 2000.

George Müller fotka
Shirley Chisholm fotka

„The Constitution they wrote was designed to protect the rights of white, male citizens. As there were no black Founding Fathers, there were no founding mothers — a great pity, on both counts.“

—  Shirley Chisholm American politician 1924 - 2005

For the Equal Rights Amendment (10 August 1970).
Kontext: The Constitution they wrote was designed to protect the rights of white, male citizens. As there were no black Founding Fathers, there were no founding mothers — a great pity, on both counts. It is not too late to complete the work they left undone. Today, here, we should start to do so.

Audre Lorde fotka
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Howard Bloom fotka

„Aristotle and Heraclitus were both right. A equals A. But A does not equal A.“

—  Howard Bloom American publicist and author 1943

When a Frog is a River? Aristotle Wrestles Heraclitus
The God Problem: How a Godless Cosmos Creates (2012)

John D. Rockefeller, Jr. fotka

„My mother and father raised but one question: Is it right, is it duty?“

—  John D. Rockefeller, Jr. American financier and philanthropist 1874 - 1960

As quoted in The Rich man and the Kingdom : John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and the Protestant establishment (1995) by Albert F. Schenkel, p. 13

Joseph Brodsky fotka
Janet Fitch fotka
John Ogilby fotka
Neville Chamberlain fotka
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Josef Albers fotka

„The cultural traits we are dealing with here, and that in the modern period have become extremely rare in this combination, may be summarised as the following:

Lineal descent was maternal, children were regarded as descendant from the mother. Property, at times also authorisations were passed down the maternal line, either from mother to daughter or from maternal uncle to the son on the sister's side of the family. Residential affairs were matrifocal, i. e. a husband joined the bride's family and he moved in with them. Both sexes were free to be promiscuous prior to marriage, whereas females were free to choose their marital spouse, they were entitled to wide-reaching rights even as wifes, and it was easy for them to get a divorce. The ritual and religious role of females was more relevant than that of males. Biological fathers were not considered related to their children, their role as educator and caretaker was held by the mother's brother who was the social father for all of her children, even if they were fathered by different men.“

—  Gisela Bleibtreu-Ehrenberg German ethnologe, sociologe, writer 1929

Vom Schmetterling zur Doppelaxt, p. 16-18, last sentence p. 15-16.
Vom Schmetterling zur Doppelaxt (1990)
Kontext: Let it be said in advance: This 'ritual dominance' of females was by no means whatsoever a matriarchy, for there never existed a female aequivalent to the social structure we refer to as 'patriarchy' today. [... ] Yet, a number of the findings which 19th century ethnologists and sociologists (even socialists) based off their figments of a proto-historical global matriarchy are certainly valid, and some of these features are empirically observable in primitive peoples even today. These findings only require to be interpreted more reasonably, that is less biased to one side or the other. Thus, one is more justified in speaking of maternal rather than "matriarchal" cultural elements when addressing these socio-cultural affairs. [... ]

The cultural traits we are dealing with here, and that in the modern period have become extremely rare in this combination, may be summarised as the following:

Lineal descent was maternal, children were regarded as descendant from the mother. Property, at times also authorisations were passed down the maternal line, either from mother to daughter or from maternal uncle to the son on the sister's side of the family. Residential affairs were matrifocal, i. e. a husband joined the bride's family and he moved in with them. Both sexes were free to be promiscuous prior to marriage, whereas females were free to choose their marital spouse, they were entitled to wide-reaching rights even as wifes, and it was easy for them to get a divorce. The ritual and religious role of females was more relevant than that of males. Biological fathers were not considered related to their children, their role as educator and caretaker was held by the mother's brother who was the social father for all of her children, even if they were fathered by different men. [... ]

Having only briefly summarised the dominant social order above, none of these traits we know hint in the slightest towards the idea that the people [of the Maternal Megalith Culture] in question were at their time aware of the causal relation between sex and giving birth.

William Wordsworth fotka

„The Child is father of the Man;
And I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.“

—  William Wordsworth English Romantic poet 1770 - 1850

My Heart Leaps Up When I Behold, (1802)
The last three lines of this form the introductory lines of the long Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood begun the next day.
Kontext: My heart leaps up when I behold
A rainbow in the sky:
So was it when my life began;
So is it now I am a man;
So be it when I shall grow old,
Or let me die!
The Child is father of the Man;
And I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.

George V of the United Kingdom fotka

„My father was frightened of his mother. I was frightened of my father and I am damned well going to see to it that my children are frightened of me.“

—  George V of the United Kingdom King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India 1865 - 1936

Attributed in Randolph Churchill's Lord Derby (1959), but said by Kenneth Rose https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_Rose in King George V (1983) to be almost certainly apocryphal.
Attributed

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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