„Each of us, when our day's work is done, must seek our ideal, whether it be love or pinochle or lobster à la Newburg, or the sweet silence of the musty bookshelves.“

—  O`Henry
O`Henry fotka
O`Henry11
americký novelista 1862 - 1910

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