„The time flies. The time flies feed on rotting clocks.“

—  Craig Clevenger, Dermaphoria

Zdroj: Dermaphoria

Posledná aktualizácia 22. máj 2020. Histórie
Craig Clevenger fotka
Craig Clevenger5
American author of contemporary fiction 1964

Podobné citáty

Groucho Marx fotka

„Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.“

—  Groucho Marx American comedian 1890 - 1977

No known citation to Marx. First appears unattributed in mid-1960s logic/computing texts as an example of the difficulty of machine parsing of ambiguous statements. Google Books http://books.google.co.uk/books?client=firefox-a&lr=&as_brr=0&q=%22fruit-flies%22+%22time+flies%22+banana&btnG=Search+Books&as_drrb_is=b&as_minm_is=0&as_miny_is=1900&as_maxm_is=0&as_maxy_is=1970. The Yale Book of Quotations dates the attribution to Marx to a 9 July 1982 net.jokes post on Usenet.
Misattributed

Jean De La Fontaine fotka

„On the wings of Time grief flies away.“

—  Jean De La Fontaine French poet, fabulist and writer. 1621 - 1695

Sur les ailes du Temps la tristesse s'envole.
Book VI (1668), fable 21.
Fables (1668–1679)
Varianta: Sadness flies away on the wings of time.

Maria Bamford fotka

„Time flies when you are anxious!“

—  Maria Bamford American actress and comedian 1970

Unwanted Thoughts Syndrome (2009)

Bob Dylan fotka

„Time is short and the days are sweet and passion rules the arrow that flies.“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Song lyrics, Empire Burlesque (1985), Dark Eyes

Edward Young fotka

„Time flies, death urges, knells call, Heaven invites,
Hell threatens.“

—  Edward Young, Night-Thoughts

Zdroj: Night-Thoughts (1742–1745), Night II, Line 292.

Ovid fotka
Nicolas Boileau-Despréaux fotka

„Time flies and draws us with it. The moment in which I am speaking is already far from me.“

—  Nicolas Boileau-Despréaux French poet and critic 1636 - 1711

Le temps fuit, et nous traine avec soi :
Le moment ou je parle est déjà loin de moi.
Épitres (1701) III, 47

Markus Zusak fotka
Haruki Murakami fotka

„The human heart is like a night bird. Silently waiting for something, and when the time comes, it flies straight toward it.“

—  Haruki Murakami, kniha Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

Zdroj: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

Herman Melville fotka
Edith Sitwell fotka

„The cap and bells of Time the Clown
That, jangling, whistled down
Young cherubs hidden in the guise
Of every bird that flies;“

—  Edith Sitwell British poet 1887 - 1964

"Clowns' Houses"
Clowns' Houses (1918)
Kontext: p>The busy chatter of the heat
Shrilled like a parakeet;
And shuddering at the noonday light
The dust lay dead and whiteAs powder on a mummy's face,
Or fawned with simian grace
Round booths with many a hard bright toy
And wooden brittle joy:The cap and bells of Time the Clown
That, jangling, whistled down
Young cherubs hidden in the guise
Of every bird that flies;And star-bright masks for youth to wear,
Lest any dream that fare
— Bright pilgrim — past our ken, should see
Hints of Reality.</p

„Time still, as he flies, brings increase to her truth,
And gives to her mind what he steals from her youth.“

—  Edward Moore English dramatist and writer 1712 - 1757

The Happy Marriage.
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

„Yes, it was swell to sleep when you were looking forward to something. Time flies by and you don’t even hear the rustle of its wings.“

—  Fredric Brown American novelist, short story author 1906 - 1972

The Angelic Angleworm (p. 70)
Short fiction, From These Ashes (2000)

Ben Croshaw fotka
Thomas Wolfe fotka
Wallace Stevens fotka
Henrik Ibsen fotka

„The State has its root in time, and will ripe and rot in time.“

—  Henrik Ibsen Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet 1828 - 1906

Letter to Georg Brandes (17 February 1871), as translated in Henrik Ibsen : Björnstjerne Björnson. Critical Studies (1899) by Georg Morris Cohen Brandes
Variant translation: The quality of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says: "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is a characteristic of the so-called state; and it is worthless.
As translated in Ibsen : The Man, His Art & His Significance (1907) by Haldane Macfall, p. 238
Variant translation: Neither moral concepts nor art forms can expect to live forever. How much are we obliged to hold on to? Who can guarantee that 2 plus 2 don't add up to 5 on Jupiter?
Kontext: He who possesses liberty otherwise than as an aspiration possesses it soulless, dead. One of the qualities of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands still in the midst of the struggle and says, "I have it," merely shows by so doing that he has just lost it. Now this very contentedness in the possession of a dead liberty is characteristic of the so-called State, and, as I have said, it is not a good characteristic. No doubt the franchise, self-taxation, etc., are benefits — but to whom? To the citizen, not to the individual. Now, reason does not imperatively demand that the individual should be a citizen. Far from it. The State is the curse of the individual. With what is Prussia's political strength bought? With the absorption of the individual in the political and geographical idea. The waiter is the best soldier. And on the other hand, take the Jewish people, the aristocracy of the human race — how is it they have kept their place apart, their poetical halo, amid surroundings of coarse cruelty? By having no State to burden them. Had they remained in Palestine, they would long ago have lost their individuality in the process of their State's construction, like all other nations. Away with the State! I will take part in that revolution. Undermine the whole conception of a State, declare free choice and spiritual kinship to be the only all-important conditions of any union, and you will have the commencement of a liberty that is worth something. Changes in forms of government are pettifogging affairs — a degree less or a degree more, mere foolishness. The State has its root in time, and will ripe and rot in time. Greater things than it will fall — religion, for example. Neither moral conceptions nor art-forms have an eternity before them. How much are we really in duty bound to pin our faith to? Who will guarantee me that on Jupiter two and two do not make five?

Ali Al-Wardi fotka
Anne Rice fotka

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